While every country in the World has its own customs and identity, there are also certain customs that are commonplace worldwide. But while these traditions might seem normal in a certain country, they are certainly not universal. For example, there are countries where eye contact is considered offensive and rude. Curious about which other things are considered freaky by foreigners' standards?

NEWBORN BABIES IN SOUTH KOREA

Newborn babies in South Korea are considered to be one year old. It’s considered that a person becomes one year older Not on their birthday (this is considered too) but for the first day of Lunar New Year. So if the baby was born on the last day in a 12th month according to the lunar calendar, it means he will turn 2 years on the first day of Lunar New Year.  


 TV LICENSE FOR EACH TV AT HOME IN GREAT BRITAIN

Residents of Great Britain need to buy a separate TV license for each TV set at home. For example, the BBC is public television and it’s funded by licensing fees paid by citizens who have TV’s and other devices where they can watch the news. So they have to buy a TV license each year, or they could be slapped with a huge fine because it’s impossible to watch TV programs illegally.


SOME WOMEN IN INDIA CAN MARRY A TREE

The reason for this tradition is that in Vedic Astrology it’s believed that people who are under the strong influence of Mars were not born for happy marriage life, and that people are called “Manglik” in India. This is especially bad for Manglik women because people believe that woman with dangerous Mars influence can worsen the health of her husband, that’s why those woman are instructed to marry a tree, so the bad influence of Mars passes to the tree, after that the tree is cut and burned.


ARRANGED BATTLES OF ORANGES IN ITALY

Every year in February The Carnevale D’ivrea is held involving a traditional battle of oranges. People are throwing oranges on each other like snowballs. According to one of the stories, a girl named Violleta who protected herself from the local Tyrant ruler who was going to use his right of ‘the first night’, guards wanted to arrest Violleta but the people saved her throwing stones on them. Today those oranges are symbolizing the stones.


A CHURCH TAX IN GERMANY

Kirchensteuer is a church tax is imposed on the parishioners of some religious communities in Germany. Roman Catholic churches, Evangelical Churches, a unitary religious society of free protestants, and  Jewish communities are among them. The size of the tax is set at 8-9% of the amount of the income tax. For example, if a parishioner pays 10,000 euros in income tax per year, they will have to pay 800 euros to the church.


FINE FOR NOT VOTING IN AUSTRALIA

Some people in the world complain about the results of an election and  declare that they will not that part in the process anymore, others are simply not allowed not to vote. In Australia it’s required to give a fine for not participating in the election, although it’s not high, it’s still a penalty.


INSTRUMENT OF EDUCATION LA CHANKLA

This instrument used moms and grandmothers in Spanish speaking countries to educate misbehavior children and teens – and it’s a slipper! It’s believed that it’s a strong weapon to discipline kids. Kids raised with this significant instrument continue to joke about this topic and they don’t think kids can be traumatized from it.


 A METRO PASSES TROUGH A BLOCK OF APARTMENTS IN CHINA

There is an untypical architectural solution in China that you  can see in the Chinese City Chongqing, the Liziba train station is located inside a residential building. The train passes through it on the level of the 6th floor.


DON’T CLEAN YOUR PLATE IN CHINA

The best way to show the chef that you liked your food is by eating every single morsel on your plate. In China, however, if you really enjoyed your meal it’s impolite to finish eating everything. Empty plates indicate that the host hasn’t served enough food and the guests are still hungry! So if you want to compliment chef, leave a little food on your plate no matter how tasty it is.


BANNED CHEWING GUM IN SINGAPORE

Famous of its super clean streets and parks, first prime Minister of Singapore wanted the city-state to be an oasis of perfection in Asia and his policies had a particular focus on public cleanliness. He made a rule of not chewing gum because the habit of sticking gum everywhere is an enemy of progress to his goal.